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Man left paralyzed after motorcycle accident hopeful after stem cell therapy

"It gives me some sort of hope that in my lifetime, I could walk again, I could regain function again, I could birth a child. And that's the biggest thing, is the hope," said Nathan Bird, who survived a motorcycle accident in 2012.

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At first, the night of Aug. 23, 2012 was like any other night on the road.

"I just had bought a new bike and fixed it up, and I was out here clowning around on it," recalled Nathan Bird.

Bird was doing tricks but lost control of his motorcycle and hit a pole.

"I blacked out. I remember waking up a little bit. There was people all around me, and I was just screaming out my mom's phone number."

He blacked out again, then woke up in the hospital.

"They put some rods in my spine. I broke my femur, broke my pelvis, cracked some ribs, collapsed lung. And they told me, 'You're paralyzed and you're not going to be able to walk again,’" he said.

After months of rehab and multiple surgeries, Bird looked into stem cell therapy.

"They were doing a lot of trials and a lot of studies on it and a lot of research. And they were having some success, but it wasn't readily available in America yet," he said.

He gave up on the idea, until he and his wife decided to try for another baby.

"If I can repair and regenerate my own spinal cord and maybe get some function going on again, then maybe I can produce my own child without having to spend thousands doing the fertility treatment."

With his wife out of work and unable to afford the treatment alone, Bird started an online fundraiser. "It was definitely trying to work against the tide, but God is great and we definitely all pulled together and we raised the money to go do it."

In July, doctors took stem cells from Bird’s stomach and injected them into his spinal cord. It could take up to nine months to see big changes, but Bird and his family remain hopeful.

"I can feel, like, tingles and slight sensations, no movement or motor function just yet, but it's doing something good," he said. "It gives me some sort of hope that in my lifetime, I could walk again, I could regain function again, I could birth a child. And that's the biggest thing, is the hope."