Advertisement

Reports: EU to not allow US tourists in initial reopening, welcoming over a dozen other countries

U.S. tourists will continue to be restricted from visiting the European Union, according to reports.

Advertisement

U.S. tourists will continue to be restricted from visiting the European Union, according to reports.

As the EU bloc reopens, it will have people from a select number of countries able to visit it at first. The New York Times reported that most U.S. travelers will be restricted.

Those countries deemed eligible include Australia, Canada, Japan, South Korea and more, The Washington Post reported.

Both news outlets reported that visitors from China would be allowed if restrictions are dropped against EU travelers to go there.

The agreement has yet to be finalized, and officials spoke anonymously.

More than 15 million Americans are estimated to travel to Europe each year. The pending changes come as the United States has recorded the highest number of infections and virus-related deaths in the world by far.

In contrast, aside from a notable new outbreak tied to a slaughterhouse in western Germany, the virus's spread has slowed across the EU and particularly in the 26 nations that make up Europe’s visa-free travel zone known as the Schengen area.

The bloc aims to revise the list of countries allowed to enter every two weeks based on developments, with new countries joining or possibly even denied access to Europe depending on the spread of the disease. The commission hopes that exemptions can be given to foreign students, non-EU citizens who live in Europe and certain highly skilled workers.

European nations are expected to reopen their borders between each other by July 1.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.