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More people buy chicks to ensure egg supply amid virus outbreak

Now, there is an increased demand for chicks from those who want a ready supply of eggs in their backyards.

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Shortages of essential items such as toilet paper and sanitizer seem to continue in stores.

The fear of perishable food being in short supply has also prompted a run on meat and chicken.

"When the stay-at-home order first went into place, there was a mad rush on eggs," said Becky Kolano of Wild Star Farm in California. "I couldn't keep them in stock and I was selling out within hours. It was pretty crazy."

There was even a time when eggs were sold out.

Now, there is an increased demand for chicks from those who want a ready supply of eggs in their backyards.

"I have waiting lists now for chicks and they're selling out within the day," Kolano said.

Based on her conversations with hopeful chicken owners, Kolano said she thinks people are interested in more than the egg supply.

"A lot of people — now that they're spending so much time at home and time with their kids — are wanting to actually do some more homesteading type of things, raising their own type of food," she said.

Tara Coronado of Walnut Grove, California also raises chickens and has seen an increase in people interested in doing the same.

"I definitely have noticed the increase of people asking for eggs," Coronado said. "I get a lot more texts, phone calls asking if I have extra eggs this week."

Coronado lives on a farm and said those interested in raising chickens should be prepared for the work it takes.

"It's just like raising a dog. You have to know what you're doing," she said. "You can't just shove them in the backyard and expect to get eggs."

It takes a chick six to nine months to lay an egg, Coronado said, so patience is also necessary.